Price Haggling and Negotiation Norms in New Zealand
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Price Haggling and Negotiation Norms in New Zealand

In many countries around the world haggling or negotiating for a better price is considered to be the standard way to conduct financial transactions and if you do not go through this process you can usually expect to pay two or even three times the price you would be expected to pay should you haggle and negotiate your way to a lower price.

In many countries around the world haggling or negotiating for a better price is considered to be the standard way to conduct financial transactions and if you do not go through this process you can usually expect to pay two or even three times the price you would be expected to pay should you haggle and negotiate your way to a lower price.

In New Zealand most prices that you see on display are the prices the seller or merchant will expect you to pay and if you begin to haggle over the price you may well be asked to leave the store or at the least receive some strange looks for what would be considered your unusual methods of shopping.

However there are exceptions to this rule and if you were to be browsing your way around a craft shop or similar and hoped to buy several items you may be able to negotiate a better price for your buying in bulk. If you wish to do some negotiating on the final price it would not be considered polite to just offer a lower price but to ask the owner or manager of the store if such a deal would be considered by them. By being polite you may be given a discount, if you just jump in attempting to undercut the offered price then your offer may well be flatly refused.

If you are hoping to purchase some electrical products or furnishings and the initial cost is over $100 then you may be able to negotiate some sort of discount especially if you offer cash instead of paying by credit or debit card. If you just ask if they offer any discounts for cash you may be pleasantly surprised by the answer you receive.

In the street markets of New Zealand’s towns and cities you may have more success as their prices are much more likely to be a little more flexible. Clearance bins are good areas to find discounted items, those showing signs of damage however slight it may be are usually on offer at less than the full retail price. If the store states that an item is in short supply offer to buy the display item and negotiate a discount for its being used while within the store. Research an item online for the best deals and then ask the store if they can match that price, if not you can always buy it online.

Buying a house in New Zealand is always open to some form of negotiations although within this complicated market the price you pay can be determined by many factors from location, how well (or badly) the house market is doing at that time and how many people are interested in a particular house. So for these many differing reasons you could make a saving of up to 10% or equally the price you have to pay to secure the sale could be by that margin above the asking price.

Car sales in the country are another area where the price you are expected to pay is open to negotiation. Buying a used car can give you a good discount from the original asking price and if you buy through a dealer you may be able to receive some extras instead of a reduction from the asking price.

When booking hotel rooms in New Zealand if you are staying for more than 2 or 3 nights you may be able to negotiate a reduction for long or extended stays. There is no set time for this category and many hotels are only used for one or two nights at a time. If you are staying in one location for longer you can always ask for a better deal. Another option is to ask if they will match the online booking price for hotel rooms. If the room has some minor points not to your liking instead of asking to be moved ask for a reduction in the price of your stay. If you are a repeat customer of the hotel or regularly stay there inform the hotel of this point and negotiate your way to a discount for being a loyal customer.

Whenever you wish to negotiate a deal whatever it is for whether buying goods or negotiating your way to secure cheaper accommodation for a few nights you should always ask to speak with the person in charge as a store assistant or desk clerk is not likely to have the authority to authorize such a deal.

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Comments (6)

Wow, they are pretty set in prices in NZ aren't they? thank you for the good and helpful info.

Good to know!

Excellent work.

Great work.

good job.

Yes it's pretty much like this in Australia too.

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